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The divine wind a love story by Garry Disher

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Published by A.A. Levine Books in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Australia

Subjects:

  • World War, 1939-1945 -- Australia -- Juvenile fiction.,
  • World War, 1939-1945 -- Australia -- Fiction.,
  • Interpersonal relations -- Fiction.,
  • Japanese -- Australia -- Fiction.,
  • Australia -- History -- 20th century -- Fiction.

Book details:

About the Edition

On the eve of World War II, Hart, an Australian boy and Mitsy, a Japanese-Australian girl, fall in love but are driven apart.

Edition Notes

Statementby Garry Disher.
GenreJuvenile fiction., Fiction.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPZ7.D6228 Di 2002
The Physical Object
Pagination153 p. ;
Number of Pages153
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3948791M
ISBN 100439369150, 0439369169
LC Control Number2001038645

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Because some Japanese at the time had the courage and professional pride to pose similar questions (as, indeed, the book relates) one comes away from reading “The Divine Wind” knowing that “Bushido spirit” (or any other supposedly unique Japanese national characteristic) did not preclude rational analysis of the circumstances and likely outcomes at the time, or fully /5(14). The Divine Wind is a concise account of how paranoia, fear and mistrust created by White Australia propaganda during WW2 (in this case, the Japanese air attack on Broome) fanned the flames of racism in our country.3/5. The Divine Wind Hardcover – January 1, by Rikiei & Tadashi Nakajima with Roger Pineau Inoguchi (Author)/5(15). In fact, the concept of the Divine Wind comes from a 13th Century typhoon that wrecked a Mongolian fleet, saving Japan from an imminent invasion. It was seen at the time as the work of the gods, who had heard and answered the prayers of the Japanese Emperor.4/5.

The Divine Wind book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers/5(4). Because some Japanese at the time had the courage and professional pride to pose similar questions (as, indeed, the book relates) one comes away from reading “The Divine Wind” knowing that “Bushido spirit” (or any other supposedly unique Japanese national characteristic) did not preclude rational analysis of the circumstances and likely outcomes at the time, or fully /5(15). This one-page guide includes a plot summary and brief analysis of The Divine Wind by Garry Disher. The Divine Wind is a work of historical fiction by young adult literature writer Garry Disher. It tracks the life of four young adults, Alice, Hartley, Mitsy, and Jamie, who grow up together in Broome, Australia in the years before World War II.   The story of The Divine Wind is centred on the main character, Hartley Penrose. Hartley is the “focalising” character, the narrator of and participant in the story, who chooses the episodes from the past that he considers important.4/5(3).

Trade Winds Introduction to the Sennosuke family – Zeke (Imazaki), Sadako and Mitsy (Mitsu). Zeke is a diver on one of Michael’s boats. Friendship between Hart, Alice and Mitsy is established. 3. Fine and Flashing Introduction to the Penrose’s servants Saltwater Jack and Bernadette, and Bernadette’s brother, Derby. The Divine Wind by Aussie author Garry Disher was first published in and has been republished many times since. It’s a wonderful little book which looks at friendship and the changes that occur through no fault of our by: 2. You remember that the book of Acts opened with a dramatic presentation of three symbols that would characterize the ministry of the Holy Spirit throughout the age of the church. These three symbols are very prominent all through the book of Acts. They were: The mighty rushing wind, the tongues as of fire, and the proclamation of various languages, the gift. The Divine Wind: Quotes “ some who had been our friends were now treated as aliens” (p1) “ my mother grew to hate Broome” (p2) “ she did not have red dirt, mangroves or pearls in her blood.” (about Ida Penrose, p2) “She wanted coolness, calmness, greenness. She .